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Jan 17 15 2:57 PM

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According to this piece of news, a high school basketball coach in the USA has been suspended for winning by too much... defined as 'unsporting conduct'. Even though the scoreline suggests they clearly did take their foot off the pedal after half-time.

Is this a purely American mindset? I saw one of ESPN's 30 for 30 documentaries about controversial american football team 'The U', where one of their greatest crimes was considered to be scoring heavily against a rival college (who they had previous with) when the game was effectively won.

Surely it is just as sporting in a competitive environment to give it your all throughout, rather than passing the ball about pretending you don't want to get more points (the nature of basketball makes this impossible without deliberately missing shots). Most winning teams will relax on a large lead anyway (reduce injury risk, try out reserve players, etc.), so if a team wants to push for a record, why not let them?

Having said all that, this guy takes it way too far:

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TheRoonBa

Posts: 5,526 Site Admin

#1 [url]

Jan 18 15 3:32 AM

I don't like this mentality. In my opinion, it goes against the very competitive nature of sport. The team might just as well not play as 'half play' because the other team is too weak. Also, it mucks up my (invisible) rankings.

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#2 [url]

Jan 18 15 2:40 PM

TheRoonBa wrote:
Also, it mucks up my (invisible) rankings.
Unless you're seriously interested in ranking the absolute mind#*@< that college/high school sports in America looks like, I wouldn't worry about it too much smiley: grin. They once had their president decide the national champion:


Nice to know we'd both get sacked coaching in that industry, though. The closest I've come to seeing it over here is primary school sports days in the long distance race. Without fail there'd always be the weakest runner in the class or someone injured that ends up half a lap down on the winner (fair scenarios considering they were trying), over the years it devolved to 'weakest runner just gives up after 50m and walks the rest'. Guess who always got the loudest applause on the finish line regardless of reason smiley: mad?

And a trend emerged alongside where 'weakest runner' would be joined by a buddy at the back, to start with a genuinely concerned friend that the parents would 'awwwww' over, eventually just becoming the 2nd weakest runner or a lazy kid with potential looking for an easy way out. The only thing that gets more applause and 'awwwws' than one person walking lazily over the line is two...

Some 'sporting' moves are fine by me, but when it becomes the expected thing to go out of your way to not perform at the best of your ability, it loses all meaning.

Last Edited By: mattsanger92 Jan 18 15 2:43 PM. Edited 1 time.

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#4 [url]

Jan 22 15 9:47 PM

Although in the case of that first race, the crowd were cheering for the winner smiley: grin.


But I don't think the cases are as similar as you do. Eric the Eel, was, regardless of ability, nominated by the Equatorial Guinean sports authorities (admittedly not the most respected in the world smiley: wink) as the best swimmer they had to offer for the Olympics, or at least the best willing to take part. And the crowd cheered partly ironically, but also because he was clearly trying his best to finish the race despite the unusual circumstances. I would compare that to the kids that came last because they were just slow or injured, they deserved to be acknowledged for their effort at least.

If Eric had just switched to a slow doggy paddle a few strokes in, or called a lifeguard to help him through, that would be more like the lazy kids that are more deserving of some good old-fashioned character-building boos (smiley: devil).

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#5 [url]

Jan 23 15 1:17 PM

But kids who are crap in a sports day are often not doing it because they want to. Eric should have been weeded out by some minimal qualifying standard that must be achieved before showing up in the first place. There are probably over a million people in Australia or the USA who are better swimmers than that.

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#6 [url]

Jan 23 15 6:12 PM

nfm24 wrote:
But kids who are crap in a sports day are often not doing it because they want to.
Very true, booing was a little tongue-in-cheek, but to actively cheer for someone essentially giving up after a few steps is something I can never get my head around. There are probably others in a sports day that don't want to do it, but they'd at least put the effort in that gets them higher in the standings, which will naturally make you feel better if you came in with low expectations.

To get an "I did my best!" sticker (as I have seen before for all those not in the top 3 of a race, something that probably makes some kids feel worse) for not doing so is sending out a wrong message. False advertising, how are they going to cope in the real world, other cliches, etc.

And as for the tale of Eric the Eel, Equatorial Guinea had a slot and needed a swimmer. Who's to say his participation was entirely voluntary smiley: devil? It probably was, but the wildcard rules exist for a bit of diversity to give some a fair chance to compete and boost the sports in those countries. An all Jamaican/American 100m sprint Final would be a highly competitive Diamond League event, but the Olympics need the balance.

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#7 [url]

Jan 23 15 6:59 PM

But they don't need absolute rank beginners competing in what is meant to be the elite level. Diversity and country-dominated finals are taken into account to some extent by limits to top 2 or 3 athletes, hence national trials etc, so a wide variety of countries are represented at least in the basic rounds, and the "fair chance to compete" is taken care of by minimal qualifying standards.
I'm not against Equatorial Guinea having a swimmer in the first preliminary round, if it was remotely plausible that he was their best one.

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#8 [url]

Feb 15 17 12:00 AM

Just stumbled across a result from the men's basketball in the 1982 Asian Games: 27-Nov-1982 Iraq 251-33 North Yemen. Reportedly, the score actually broke the electronic scoreboard which could not exceed 199.

After extensive and thorough database cross-referencing (i.e. a quick email to Mark), it seems that this might be a world record thrashing for international basketball. As I personally know nothing about basketball, does anybody know of a bigger win?

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#9 [url]

Feb 15 17 5:28 PM

Couldn't find any basketball scores bigger than that (I assume the one in my original post may have been a contender if the winning team had kept consistency), but funnily enough I found out the other day about an american football game that ended 222-0 in the highest college division, still a record to this day for adult-level games.

If you've got 20 minutes then this is worth a watch, summarises an epic tale of legal obligation, players better suited to finding a loophole in that legal obligation, terrifying opponents into submission, and petty vengeance:


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#10 [url]

Feb 15 17 10:42 PM

Restricting to the international arena, I see that in the 1923 Far East Games there are various online copy/paste mentions of a single player scoring over 100 pts, but oddly, no mention of the actual score in that game. Seems odd that so many people are happy to paste a factoid while adding zero original contribution of their own.

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TheRoonBa

Posts: 5,526 Site Admin

#11 [url]

Feb 16 17 7:07 AM

nfm24 wrote:
Restricting to the international arena, I see that in the 1923 Far East Games there are various online copy/paste mentions of a single player scoring over 100 pts, but oddly, no mention of the actual score in that game. Seems odd that so many people are happy to paste a factoid while adding zero original contribution of their own.

It's odd that such a high score was achieved (in the gold medal match against China), particularly when in the 1921 Far Eastern Games, China beat Philippines in the gold medal match, by only 30-27 - which is a terribly low score for basketball.

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#15 [url]

Feb 17 17 8:53 PM

nfm24 wrote:
That could be another trivia question : what is the international basketball with the fewest points in total? Was there ever a 0-0 draw?
I think you'd have to make all the players drunk first smiley: wink.

And for the second time this week, I see your question on unusual basketball scores and raise you a video on unusual american football scores smiley: alien. Yes, I did originally see them both in the same sitting...


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