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#41 [url]

Jun 16 14 7:41 PM

Giampaolo wrote:

What I wanted to say, in my previous post, is: of course Mussolini had no right to choose the referees and his action (if done) must be blamed. But also all delinquent actions that affect a regular development of a match, like the three examples (damaging Italy) I cited must be blamed.         
Not only Mussolini has to be blamed. I think FIFA was even more to blame as they accepted Mussolini to choose the referees, which actually should have been FIFA's job.

BTW FIFA also accepted Italy violated the rules by fielding ineligible players at the time. FIFA should have known their rules and should have known which players came in action for another country within the past three years.

Austrian legendary team manager objected against FIFA Italy would field players as Monti, Guaita and Orsi in the semifinals against Austria. But FIFA rejected Meisl's protest, so FIFA also made it happen the Italians violated the rules.



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#42 [url]

Jun 16 14 10:19 PM

If we want to blame FIFA (and I agree to do it), we have to recall not only the 1934 WC, but all the occasions when they heavily manipulated other WC Tnmts, including those that damaged Italy.
And now let me also spend a word about the "ridiculous" software (kind of  Walt Disney cartoon) showed yesterday for the first time, after years and years of gestation in Blatter's belly, to establish the "goal/no goal" action. 

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#43 [url]

Jun 16 14 11:17 PM

What was so bad about the software?
Sure, they should not show every goal (even the obvious ones), but it can be useful in some rare cases. It will be interesting to see if they go further and use video replay to decide fouls, offsides etc.

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#44 [url]

Jun 17 14 6:04 AM

The "goal/no goal technology"must be used, of course: what happened during England-Germany is an intolerable absurdity, to be absolutely avoided.
But I'd like to have a more professional demonstration of the questioned action.
For instance. The projection on horizontal surface of two lines:
1. the tangent to the sphere
2..the connection of the two extreme internal points of the goal-posts.
If there is "light" between the two lines, is "goal"; if not, is "no goal".
And all of it to be clearly elaborated,  starting from the "eye" of the camera, placed in strategic position.
What I saw, last sunday, did not convince me about the accuracy of said image's elaboration.
Am I wrong?         

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#45 [url]

Jun 17 14 8:04 AM

Ah I see, an you want more actual measurement data (perhaps even with error margins) displayed rather than a simple cartoon image. I agree there, but most this could be something that is calculated only internally, and it may be overkill to display this on the screen.

It would be good to see the motion of the ball in the graphics, not just the final position.
There is also the issue of whether the line painted on the field is exactly in the same position as the goal-line in the simulation.

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#46 [url]

Jun 17 14 1:37 PM

nfm24 wrote:
It would be good to see the motion of the ball in the graphics, not just the final position.
Yes, exactly.
And the painted line on the field should not be taken into consideration, for software purpose, because it is necessarily (due to its nature) a ragged, not a clean line.  

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#47 [url]

Jun 17 14 11:10 PM

Indeed but on the video replay the fans will judge based on the actual painted line.

To me it seems anomalous that the referee can now be sure if the ball is over the line , but he cannot use TV replays to check if a goal was offside or not, when every TV channel has done exactly this for 30 years or more.

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#48 [url]

Jun 18 14 9:55 AM

nfm24 wrote:
To me it seems anomalous that the referee can now be sure if the ball is over the line , but he cannot use TV replays to check if a goal was offside or not, when every TV channel has done exactly this for 30 years or more.

Also to me, in today's football,  it seems essential and unprocrastinable the help of technology in "offside/not offside" cases.
The problem is how to coordinate in real time the linesman's flagging with the intervention of the camera.


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#49 [url]

Jun 18 14 11:26 AM

One can do it just like in field hockey where they have the video ref. The rule is quite simple. If a team does not agree a referee's decision they have the right asking to consult the video ref (let's call it 4th official). They will lose this right if they (the team) are wrong. Also the referee has the right to consult the video ref if he wants. The advantage is everyone is happy because discussions are reduced to a minimum.

I even think that the offside/non offside cases (in field hockey there is no offside rule) are quite simple to tackle within a few seconds. Just as we can see on television within a few seconds if it was offside or not. For these cases a video ref is not necessay. A screen will do.

Earlier this month both men's and women's Worldchampionships were orgaized in Den Haag and even many soccer lovers in Holland say we can learn quite a lot from field hockey.

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#50 [url]

Jun 19 14 2:47 PM

Can the same system which pinpoints the ball's position be used to track all the players positions? Then offside could also be determined electronically. Although this is harder, e.g. offside is with any part of the body (except arms) and also the system will need to establish the exact moment the pass is played, and would not be able to decide things such as "second phase" or "interfering with play" etc.

It would seem more logical to use video replay to decide any off-sides which were important.

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#51 [url]

Jul 5 14 8:47 AM

Today's the 20th anniversary of an epic match. On July 5, 1994, Italy faced Nigeria in the USA '94 eighth finals. Maybe nobody here remembers that challenge, but I keep considering it as one of the most dramatic and emotional games ever played by the Italian National team. Nigeria weren't an extraordinary team, but Italy, as usual, got into troubles by themselves.
I remember very well how I celebrated Roberto Baggio's goals. It was an unbelievable afternoon, I'll never forget it.


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#52 [url]

Jul 4 16 8:59 AM

Exactly 10 years ago - July 4, 2006 - Germany and Italy played one of the greatest and closest matches in the history of the World Cup. That 2-0 to Germany still represents one of the most memorable achievements for a whole generation of fans. I keep considering the decisive pass by Andrea Pirlo to Fabio Grosso as one of the most brilliant assists ever, together with the one by Diego Maradona to Claudio Caniggia in Argentina 1-0 Brazil at the 1990 World Cup.



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#54 [url]

Jul 9 16 9:34 AM

Exactly 10 years ago - July 9, 2006. As if it were yesterday.


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