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#121 [url]

Jul 12 15 4:29 PM

This part of the story's a bit old, but recent news of next year's race calendar does have the Italian GP on it, although Bernie Ecclestone doesn't seem to mind too much if the Monza track is dropped after that: http://www.grandprix247.com/2015/04/20/baku-good-replacement-for-monza-claims-ecclestone/

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#122 [url]

Jul 13 15 8:49 AM

Monza will surely disappear from Formula One. This money-machine is beginning to annoy me. That's why I humbly invite everybody on this forum to begin following cycling, a noble sport where passion and human efforts haven't been defeated by the power of money yet.

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#125 [url]

Sep 4 16 9:41 AM

And this is just the beginning! The next masterstroke will be the Summer Olympic Games in Rome in 2024! With the umpteenth drain on Italian public finances, yahooo...

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#126 [url]

Sep 4 16 1:37 PM

Luca wrote:
Summer Olympic Games in Rome in 2024!
To quote Sir Alf Ramsey: "If selected."

It isn't a bad thing if you get it though, speaking from personal experience the feel-good factor alone is 'worth it', if you can throw in a reasonably sustainable legacy programme (more London (ignoring the West Ham situation) than Athens) even better.

There are plenty of other things to worry about when it comes to public finances, I worked in a council for a couple of months and saw (among other things) renovation staff spending a morning taking away large office dividers (which were in places they weren't really needed anyway), and replacing them with brand new ones a quarter of the size, and heard one of them say something about meeting quotas. Getting rid of small things like that (and the wages of middle-managers paid to focus on these things) and you have plenty of budget to get your country something nice.

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#127 [url]

Sep 4 16 3:15 PM

Wow, glad to hear that mine is not the only country to have "those" problems... But I fear here they are more serious and less circumscribed...

I agree that massive public investments in an Olympic project, if well administered, are worth accepting. But unfortunately I've learned to mistrust the Italian institutions as to waste of public funds.

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#128 [url]

Sep 4 16 9:56 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
Getting rid of small things like that (and the wages of middle-managers paid to focus on these things) and you have plenty of budget to get your country something nice.

I recall the episode of "The Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy" when Arthur and Ford are picked up by a spaceship populated entirely by  telephone sanitizers and middle management executives (mostly cryogenically frozen), who had been discarded into deep space by the rest of their planet's population on the false pretext that some undetermined calamity was coming.  

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#129 [url]

Oct 30 16 8:53 PM

I don't really understand much about Formula 1, but from what I can tell, Lewis Hamilton is obviously the best driver by some way, and behind him there is just a sort of random noise where the effects such as car power, weather, tyre choice etc is about the same size of fluctuation as the abilities of the other drivers. Or in other words, Hamilton is clearly the best unless he screws up in some way, and there isn't much the others can do about it.

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#130 [url]

Oct 30 16 10:07 PM

Right now (and last year, and the year before that) it's just the Mercedes car he's driving that's extremely dominant (as in, the team has won every single race this year except for two, one where the two Mercedes took eachother out and another where both had their own problems), so the championship battle is between Hamilton and his team-mate Nico Rosberg... Rosberg currently leading with two races left.

Although the only reason for that is Hamilton's engine blowing up from a winning position in one race (the second one that I mentioned above)... if that result stood then he'd have a narrow lead right now instead of being one slip-up away from losing it all... but at the same time Hamilton doesn't do a shoey if he wins:


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#132 [url]

Oct 31 16 10:23 AM

I have a scoop! Do you know that Daniel Ricciardo and the former world champion Mika Häkkinen often go karting about 4 miles from my hometown...? smiley: smokin

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#133 [url]

Nov 25 16 7:04 PM

Let's hope in a fair epilogue. I smell a collision though....
Maybe I say this because two legendary crashes in the decisive Grand Prix are still fresh in my mind. I grew up with the infamous "contacts" between Michael Schumacher and his direct opponents in the 1990s. In 1997, against Jacques Villeneuve, he was disqualified, but I remember very well also his crash against Damon Hill in 1994. I keep thinking Schumi should have been disqualified then, and that Hill is the true 1994 World Champion.
Just like 22 years ago, now we have again a German driver versus a British one...

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#134 [url]

Nov 25 16 7:42 PM

1997 is painfully blatant, 1994 is a bit more dubious, a lot harder to tell if he was aiming for Hill or just blindly trying to take the corner:



And this comes 2 weeks too late, but Max Verstappen is a beast, 5-10 more laps and he would have won the race easily:



Also, I want to have the option for Dutch commentary on every race from now on:


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#135 [url]

Nov 25 16 8:57 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
1994 is a bit more dubious, a lot harder to tell if he was aiming for Hill or just blindly trying to take the corner:
But he also knew that damaging irreparably Hill's car, the world title would surely be his, as he was ahead in the table...

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#136 [url]

Nov 27 16 12:51 PM

That would be one way of looking at it and considering he was a point ahead at the time maybe makes sense in the moment if he feared Hill would pull away, I just don't see how anyone could guarantee it would work, while Hill was in his pitstop at the end of that clip it seems like there's still a chance he could get going and recover the points he needs, making Schumacher's move a complete backfire.

Not saying that he didn't do it on purpose (he might be the only one that knows for sure, and even then the mind might go into a self-defence mechanism), just that it seemed like there was a long way to go in the race, and to risk crashing out of the race for a chance to retire your opponent could go wrong very easily.

Meanwhile though, a nice touch from Jenson Button, bringing back his Brawn helmet for his final race...

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#138 [url]

Nov 28 16 10:19 PM

Because manufactured and/or corporate outrage.

I really don't get Mercedes' stance on this, that winning the race for the team is their #1 priority for this of all races, they have enough of a points gap to win next year's team standings as well if it carried over, it's surely more entertaining for the brand for one of the most nail-biting finishes to a championship ever, rather than riding off quickly into the sunset and praying something goes wrong with Rosberg. Seeing Hamilton go slower with each passing lap near the end was hilarious but it was what he needed to do to try and get his result (stopping short of the Schumacher or Senna-style antics).

For the record, I'm not a huge Hamilton fan (his Britishness is the main factor in me wanting him to win, and even then it's hard not to enjoy the Red Bull drivers when they do well), but that was one of the best displays of racing I've seen to give himself a shot, and if I was in his shoes (taking an F1 championship down to the last few laps implies I would have the skills to do so), I would 100% be doing the same thing he did.

Congratulations to Nico Rosberg for seeing it through though, and bonus points for almost breaking Bernie in the celebrations...

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#139 [url]

Dec 2 16 7:00 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
That would be one way of looking at it and considering he was a point ahead at the time maybe makes sense in the moment if he feared Hill would pull away, I just don't see how anyone could guarantee it would work, while Hill was in his pitstop at the end of that clip it seems like there's still a chance he could get going and recover the points he needs, making Schumacher's move a complete backfire.
Not saying that he didn't do it on purpose (he might be the only one that knows for sure, and even then the mind might go into a self-defence mechanism), just that it seemed like there was a long way to go in the race, and to risk crashing out of the race for a chance to retire your opponent could go wrong very easily.

He surely feared that his impact with the wall would create problems to his Benetton in the following laps and that Hill would overtake him therefore. So he decided for a desperate move in order to damage his opponent the more he could. Look what happened in 1997. It was more or less the same thing. Villeneuve was speeder and was going to overtake Michael, but Michael crashed against his opponent in order to knock him out one way or another. The difference is that against Damon his attempt was successful, against Jacques it was not.
There was a disproportion between the FIA's decisions in 1994 and in 1997 though. In 1997 Schumi was very severely punished (his global score was set to zero), while in 1994 he was not. Very inconsistent. His 1997 manoeuvre probably deserved a less severe sanction, but his 1994 move did not deserve to be unpunished. Nobody can convince me the 1994 crash was not intentional.

mattsanger92 wrote:
Congratulations to Nico Rosberg for seeing it through though, and bonus points for almost breaking Bernie in the celebrations...

He made me smile when he celebrated singing in... Italian. Minute 3:48



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#140 [url]

Dec 2 16 8:54 PM

And now he's retired. What a bottler.

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