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TheRoonBa

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#41 [url]

Jul 24 14 11:42 PM

We must also remember that not everyone who is obese is completely at fault. Depression and other illnesses can lead to obesity, without the person necessarily eating any more than a 'normal' person would.

I would like to initiate a beef about people who tell you to stop complaining and move on, and "stop living in the past". That last one is particularly annoying, as the past is directly responsible for the present (and future), and remembering the past is one way of trying to ensure that bad past events don't happen again. But apparently, that's not allowed, and we must all forget everything we've learned and bumble ignorantly along and constantly be surprised by things that have happened to us many times before simply because we choose not to "live in the past".

Those same people who tell you not to live in the past are probably the most likely to bear a grudge or remember one mistake you made ten years ago.

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#42 [url]

Jul 27 14 5:18 PM

Obesity is also, of course, considered a positive trait in some parts of the world such as the South Pacific, means you're eating well and therefore wealthy smiley: eyes...

I can agree that it isn't 100% a person's fault sometimes, my complaint is directed mainly towards those who really don't have anything major to 'get over'  (hard to judge but there should be differences between someone genuinely depressed/ill or someone pulling out the 'glandular' card smiley: mad). I'm no anorexic, it made me surprised recently when I went into a supermarket and noticed that there were no shirts in my size (equivalent to an S or M), only higher. Whether Tesco are just selling well or have taken market research with disturbing results is a mystery to me.

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#43 [url]

Jul 27 14 5:20 PM

And I second that about those who tell you to 'move on' from something. My philosophy with someone upset is usually to just give them space and time to reflect before they move on, might not work for those that prefer an arm round the shoulder but I go for the 'how would I like to be treated' mindset, rightly or wrongly.

Football-related example for 'bad past events' would be Steven Gerrard. No matter what he has done or will go on to achieve, that slip-up vs. Chelsea last season (and to a lesser extent, the backpass vs. Uruguay in the World Cup (lesser for impact on the end result)) will be two great 'what-ifs' that eat at him for the rest of his life long after others have forgotten. While you can 'make up' for things like that in the future (here's hoping smiley: wink), it would be very rare to find someone that can completely remove it from memory, and perfectly acceptable to let them look back now and then if it helps. It could be annoying for many if we saw Gerrard 10 years from now sulking in his well-stocked medal room, but swapping places it would be easily understandable.

P.S. - The same people telling you to not live in the past are also probably those you see shouting louder and angrier than they should be whilst forcing their child into an activity they failed at when they were younger. These people transcend generations...

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#44 [url]

Jul 28 14 5:56 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
Football-related example for 'bad past events' would be Steven Gerrard. No matter what he has done or will go on to achieve, that slip-up vs. Chelsea last season (and to a lesser extent, the backpass vs. Uruguay in the World Cup (lesser for impact on the end result)) will be two great 'what-ifs' that eat at him for the rest of his life long after others have forgotten. While you can 'make up' for things like that in the future (here's hoping smiley: wink), it would be very rare to find someone that can completely remove it from memory, and perfectly acceptable to let them look back now and then if it helps. It could be annoying for many if we saw Gerrard 10 years from now sulking in his well-stocked medal room, but swapping places it would be easily understandable.
Wasn't it Euro 2004 where Gerrard gave a backpass directly to France in injury time which caused the last minute winner? 
That was 10 years ago, I believe.

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TheRoonBa

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#45 [url]

Jul 29 14 1:23 AM

nfm24 wrote:Wasn't it Euro 2004 where Gerrard gave a backpass directly to France in injury time which caused the last minute winner? 
That was 10 years ago, I believe.



Only in the real world was 2014 ten years ago. As we all know, Greece won Euro 2004, but that was in some alternative universe where Steven Gerrard was actually the reincarnation of a barnacle. In those circumstances, we cannot blame him, because he was still nursing his former crustacean soul.

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#47 [url]

Aug 1 14 7:14 PM

Crab-walking away from that note, I'll put this thread back in the direction of the world of employment, or rather public sector work smiley: mad. I recently took up a temp role at my local council, turning down a higher-paid temping offer from a company in the process believing it was the better long-term move.

The main things I learned?
- It takes forever to get anything beneficial done (such as getting computer and system access, still not fully set up after 1-and-a-half months despite my pressing (and being told this was good speed compared to the norm smiley: eek))
- There are rules and sub-rules for every type of paperwork, and people will be shocked (in a distressed way) at any innovative common sense suggestions that are not within those guidelines
- The 'meetings before meetings' stereotype is inaccurate but not too far off
- You will be tasked with taking half-hour from your day to fill out a health & safety assessment if you move to a new desk (informed that the situation was previously worse than this smiley: alien)
- As the newest person you will sometimes be tasked with counting the number of entries in an entire box of files for the benefit of a manager working from home that day
- And finally, not to choose it again. Also that 'action' is a widely-accepted verb smiley: tired.

To cut a long and boring story short, I was let go from the struggling and increasingly-underpowered team, with the main reason being... "not enough staff". To 'train me', that is, in the challenging art of processing expense claims and using their computer programmes, which I couldn't learn until I had a working system and staff with time free from processing so they could teach me how to process smiley: eyes. And told that I most likely would have been kept had I been in any other department, or a full-time worker, or if they were fully-staffed smiley: alien.

Co-workers were great and supportive, just too overworked to do much to help, while some members of management just appeared to be... A little communication from their end could have gone a long way, any 'mistakes' they informed me of after the fact could have been told to me at the time as anything they had said was taken on-board, when I told the manager his tone was essentially "sorry, didn't realise, but too late to change the decision back now". If they'd have been a little clearer in the interview, I'd probably be almost £1k and -1 headache better off right now smiley: ohwell...

Sorry for the long and generic rant, but that's what this thread is here for and what I wrote just about covers the surface of the topic, if one person declines temporary public-sector work because of this, then it's been worthwhile smiley: wink.

Last Edited By: mattsanger92 Aug 1 14 7:18 PM. Edited 1 time.

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#48 [url]

Aug 1 14 9:56 PM

(Most) public sector organizations are far more inefficient in these matters than (most) companies.
Basically because they don't have to be efficient to survive.

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#49 [url]

Aug 2 14 3:29 PM

Exactly, I still don't lower the importance of what the public sector does, I saw things in there that naturally made you know they would be out of business quickly if they were in it to make a profit. Would contribute to a fairly dull and uninspired attitude in there as well - working for a company the aim is profit and that works as one of the best possible incentives if you are set to benefit from it. Being a cog in a large machine that helps teachers get paid in a 'too many cooks' scenario... the only motivation in that place is to just do what you can every day.

A place like that can definitely can be very inefficient, there was one morning where perfectly fine set of black wall dividers were taken down replaced with some pathetic-looking smaller blue ones that couldn't even cover the shelves it was placed behind. To perform this task a team of 3 were brought in, taking them a quarter-hour to do so. When they were asked for a reason, it boiled down to 'just asked to', and that the blue ones were 'just sitting in storage and needed to be used' (black ones to be destroyed smiley: alien). When adding more blues were suggested by someone to make it all look a little less pointless, the answer was that there was a 'x in, x out' policy that had to be obeyed, in this case swapping out 3 large wall tiles for 3 small ones that were unable to serve as a 'wall' smiley: eyes...

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#50 [url]

Aug 2 14 10:49 PM

Many people have no initiative or genuine interest/curiosity/imagination in what they are doing.
Count yourself lucky/cursed!

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#52 [url]

Aug 4 14 4:13 PM

nfm24 wrote:
Many people have no initiative or genuine interest/curiosity/imagination common sense in what they are doing.
Count yourself lucky/cursed!

That is what sums up my experience there, if I had a more engaging role they may have got to enjoy the other stuff. A reason given for my departure was a lack of confidence when I was asking questions, to which my hindsight response would be smiley: eyes.

But thanks I think, rare to receive a compliment from the founder of this thread smiley: wink.
  

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TheRoonBa

Posts: 5,442 Site Admin

#54 [url]

Aug 5 14 6:06 PM

nfm24 wrote:
When the Enlightenment comes, we will all find our true calling.
No!  That's too long to wait. Can't we just have a cup of tea and then find our true calling after a few custard creams?

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#55 [url]

Aug 5 14 6:28 PM

Anyone care to guess which food was I about to reach for before I clicked the thread?

Had 'a few' of them on many occasions smiley: tongue but no closer to that true calling... although I'm not a regular tea drinker so never had the two together... all makes sense now.

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TheRoonBa

Posts: 5,442 Site Admin

#59 [url]

Aug 7 14 2:16 AM

Hobnobs are dangerous and should be banned. There's nothing worse than an oat on the throat.

Custard creams may be drab, but at least they are safe. The worst thing that's ever happened to me when I have eaten a custard cream is that one half has broken off and fallen into the tea.

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#60 [url]

Aug 7 14 6:53 AM

Jaffa cakes will be the new currency after the Enlightenment.

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