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#301 [url]

Nov 25 16 5:56 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
the number of brilliant sports stories of the year seems to be juxtaposed by everything non-sport having some not-so-brilliant stories
So this theory of mine still stands I believe, but there are some days where your faith gets seriously tested...

Not something I haven't seen coming for a couple of years now, it's just the loss of a constant from pretty much your entire time following a sport... so to have that happen twice in the space of a few hours... smiley: indifferent

More on topic, most places starting Christmas in mid-November now rather than the odd shop jumping the gun.

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#302 [url]

Nov 25 16 7:19 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
mattsanger92 wrote:
the number of brilliant sports stories of the year seems to be juxtaposed by everything non-sport having some not-so-brilliant stories
So this theory of mine still stands I believe, but there are some days where your faith gets seriously tested...

Not something I haven't seen coming for a couple of years now, it's just the loss of a constant from pretty much your entire time following a sport... so to have that happen twice in the space of a few hours... smiley: indifferent
I understand what you mean. I had the same feeling in 2004, when I lost both Roberto Baggio and Marco Pantani in the space of a couple of months. And sadly, in the case of Pantani, the pain was much stronger and inconsolable.

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#303 [url]

Dec 13 16 10:14 PM

So, who didn't see something like this coming?

To be fair I couldn't pin exactly what 'it' would have been, and his anti-EU campaigning has been going on for so long that it isn't going to go hand-in-hand with his Sky takeover, but profit and/or power is always his endgame, credit to him for ruthless efficiency though (or something). Rupert Murdoch is basically a real-life supervillain, and as previously predicted is still flying high at the top of the Arsehole Premier League despite some quality opposition.

To bring it back to the small gripes though, Tesco's self-service checkouts have a creepy robot Santa voice thing going on right now...

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#306 [url]

Jan 20 17 8:46 PM

Well, at least when it comes to defending free kicks I expect them to be better at forming walls and making Mexico pay for them.

image

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#308 [url]

Jan 24 17 7:08 PM

Hmm... that might be an even stronger deterrent than Trump's fantasy plan.

Minor gripe of the week - YouTube adverts that obnoxiously tell me to not hit the skip button, I find it tends to have the opposite effect.

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#309 [url]

Mar 15 17 9:41 PM

Only actually saw this for the first time last week so it's probably a new trend, but people who use a self-service check-out for a trolley-load of items. A bleedin' trolley smiley: mad.

I just want to understand the logic here, not only is a manned till going to get the job done quicker, it saves the shopper a huge amount of the work involved in scanning so many items, surely doesn't even fit on the weighing pad of a self-serve, and it takes up time and space that other shoppers could be using, the ones that are actually trying to just get a few quick items and go (unless of course they I need to feed the machine some loose change smiley: indifferent). If you're worried about an embarassing purchase do it seperately, and if you really insist on self-serving a trolley-load of items then do your shopping at 3am or something.

First time I saw this there were 2 offenders taking up half of the 4 stations available, the second there were 3 with bigger loads, luckily security started dealing with it so it clearly isn't some rules being relaxed on Tesco's part. Of course my brave fight against this weird trend involved waiting patiently in the queue and quietly tutting.

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#310 [url]

Mar 16 17 12:22 AM

Surely it's some sort of scam to effectively shoplift a load of stuff, seeing as it would be harder for the machine to be consistent with the weight of such large amounts? Or perhaps they are just very slow and methodical packers and can't take the pace of the conveyer belt.

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#311 [url]

Mar 16 17 8:11 PM

nfm24 wrote:
Or perhaps they are just very slow and methodical packers and can't take the pace of the conveyer belt.
They would hate it in Sweden then, something I noticed there was how they have a wide end to the belts with a movable diagonal barrier so the next person can be served without waiting for the first to finish up, also probably a subtle way to tell people to get a move on. Could be a generalisation but I'm guessing a lot of those self-service trolley folk might not take to that efficient idea purely on account of it being foreign and/or sensible...

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#312 [url]

Mar 17 17 1:30 AM

mattsanger92 wrote:
... a subtle way to tell people to get a move on. ... might not take to that efficient idea purely on account of it being foreign and/or sensible...

In the Germanic discount supermarkets (such as Aldi) they take the less subtle approach of practically throwing the items through the barcode scanner in order to evacuate the customers as fast as possible, perhaps fearing they might start shoplifting giant slabs of mockolate if left to their own devices for a few seconds. 


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