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TheRoonBa

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Jun 4 14 1:38 PM

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Continued from here

In the case of MVV, MVV is clearly an abbreviation.  We can take out the VV (Football Association) and we are left with M - which clearly stands for Maastricht.  It's like "Manchester United FC" being abbreviated to MUFC.  It just seems more popular to abbreviate in certain countries.  Everyone calls Manchester United "Man United" or "Man U", but nobody calls them MUFC.  And Liverpool is never called LFC.

Likewise, we can easily see that VVV can be "Venlo Football Club", which can be shortened to Venlo.

In England, I guess the closest example is QPR.  Most people say Q.P.R., but the club's name is Queens Park Rangers.  Sometimes, abbreviations are harder to spot - for example, for the Scottish club Airdrieonians (which basically means "people from Airdrie"), most people call them just Airdrie.

A curious example is AFC Bournemouth of the English 2nd level.  Most people just refer to them as Bournemouth, but this is wrong.  There is an older club already called Bournemouth (they play at Level 9 in the Wessex League), and so AFC Bournemouth had to use AFC to distinguish them from this team. However, due to the large gap between the two teams, there is rarely any confusion. They were first called Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic Football Club - AFC in the current name stands for Athletic Football Club.

In circumstances where a team has gone out of business (for example Halifax Town), sometimes a "Phoenix club" is started by supporters' groups, but for legal reasons, has to begin life with a different name.  So, for example, sometimes they simply add AFC or FC to their name (FC Halifax Town) until they are allowed to use the original name of the club again.  Other examples include AFC Wimbledon, AFC Telford United, Darlington 1883, Newport AFC (now back to the original Newport County).  In many of these cases, the abbreviation is not really meant to stand for anything, it's just a tool to avoid legal problems.

Other abbreviations probably have to stay as abbreviations.

Rooms Katholieke Combinatie Waalwijk is a bit of a mouthful.  Waalwijk Roman Catholic Combination - in England, this is the kind of name clubs very low down the pyramid have.  For example "Sunderland Ryhope Community Association" at Level 9 in the pyramid.  As they move higher up, the names become more streamlined and professional.


Last Edited By: TheRoonBa Jun 4 14 1:46 PM. Edited 5 times

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#1 [url]

Jun 4 14 6:02 PM

In Holland they are keen on abbreviations. NAC stands for NOAD-Advendo-Combinatie as NAC is a fusion club between NOAD and Advendo.

NOAD stands for: Nooit Opgeven Altijd Doorzetten
Advendo for: Aangenaam Door Vermaak En Nuttig Door Ontspanning

Later NAC was changed into NAC Breda, but including the name of Breda is just city markelting. The full name of this club is now: Nooit Opgeven Altijd Doorzetten Aangenaam Door Vermaak En Nuttig Door Ontspanning Combinatie Breda.

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#2 [url]

Jun 4 14 6:07 PM

MVV can of course also be Maaslandse Voetbalvereniging (MVV'27), Mariaparochiese Voetbalvereniging (MVV'29) or Meterse Voetbalvereniging (MVV'58). BTW, since 2010 MVV Maastricht stands for "Maatschappelijke Voetbal Vereniging Maastricht" ("Socially Football Club Maastricht"). The amateurs of the Maastrichtse Voetbalvereniging (MVV'02, the club was split in 1978) was dissolved in 2004.


When VVV was split in an amateur club and a professional club in 1966, the latter was named "FC VVV", in English: Football Club Venlose Football Club... Nowadays the official name is VVV-Venlo. The amateurs play as VVV'03. Note there is a FCV (Football Club Venlo), and there was RKSV Venlo till they merged in 2012.

NAC Breda stands for NOAD-ADVENDO Combinatie, where NOAD stands for "Nooit Opgeven Altijd Doorzetten" ("Never Give-up Always Carry-on"), and ADVENDO for "Aangenaam Door Vermaak En Nuttig Door Ontspanning" ("Pleasant Through Entertainment And Useful By Relaxation").

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#4 [url]

Jun 4 14 7:30 PM

No, they sing: "We have an N, we have an O, we have an O, we have an I, we have a T, we have an O, we have a P, we have a G, we have an E, we have a V, we have an E, we have an N, we have an A, we have an L, we have a T, we have an I, we have a J, we have a D, we have a D, we have an O, we have an O, we have an R, we have a Z, we have an E, we have a T, we have a T, we have an E, we have an N, we have an A, we have an A, we have an N, we have a G, we have an E, we have an N, we have an A, we have an A, we have an M, we have a D, we have an O, we have an O, we have an R, we have a V, we have an E, we have an R, we have an M, we have an A, we have an A, we have a K, we have an E, we have an N, we have an N, we have a U, we have a T, we have a T, we have an I, we have a G, we have an D, we have an O, we have an O, we have an R, we have an O, we have an N, we have a T, we have an S, we have a P, we have an A, we have an N, we have an N, we have an I, we have an N, we have a G, we have a C, we have an O, we have an M, we have a B, we have an I, we have an N, we have an A, we have a T, we have an I, we have an E, we have a B, we have an R, we have an E, we have a D, we have an A". smiley: smile

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#6 [url]

Jun 5 14 8:24 AM

In Africa, particularly in the French-speaking countries, abbreviations are quite common:

ASEC (Association Sportive des Employés de Commerce) Abidjan
TP (Tout Puissant) Mazembe
DCMP (Daring Club Motema Pembe) Kinshasa
WAC (Wydad Athletic Club) Casablanca

In France:

En Avant Guingamp is often called EAG;
Olympique Gymnaste Club, based in Nice,
is often called OGC.

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TheRoonBa

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#7 [url]

Jun 5 14 10:33 AM

Horrible. And then of course we have players (CR7). I think we should ban football altogether due to this indiscriminate use of abbreviations, and start a new sport called FB. GKs, Fs, Ms and Ds will play against those in the opposing T and the winner will be the team who scores the most Gs (as defined by the R). NTs will be composed of the best Ps in a C, and will compete against each other ever 4Y for a WC.

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#8 [url]

Jun 5 14 12:54 PM

Just ban all letters and alphabets, so that only sign language, semaphore and smoke signals are left. Then suddenly the assistant referees are the kings.

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#9 [url]

Jun 5 14 7:30 PM

In Brazil, it's also very common: in Alagoas state, there are CRB, CSA and ASA (the three main teams of the state); in Piauí, CRAC; in Mato Grosso do Sul, CENE. The ABC, from Rio Grande do Norte, though, is called ABC Futebol Clube. Other teams, like Marília (MAC) and Joinville (JEC), have their abbreviation as the main nickname.

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TheRoonBa

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#10 [url]

May 27 15 1:52 PM

In this case, I prefer the North American naming system of "City + Team name" = "Washington Redskins", "Toronto Blizzard" (though perhaps the nicknames sound "too" American). At least it's very easy to understand. "The Blizzard club who plays in Toronto". We could have "Derby Rams", "Leeds Peacocks", "Leicester Foxes", "Bournemouth Cherries", but people don't seem to like having the nicknames as part of the name (in the UK at least).

Clubs have no need to have 7 or 8 words in their name in the first place. I guess football is not very imaginative (in the UK anyway), with most teams taking common names such as "City" or "Town" or "United", with a few "Athletic", "Rovers" and "Albion".

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#11 [url]

May 27 15 2:40 PM

The protest of fans regarding Hull City Tigers, and even changing the shirt colour at Cardiff, shows that British fans are less willing to go along with these American franchise adjustments.

Besides, not all of the "CITY NICKNAME" teams actually play in that city. East Rutherford Giants...

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#15 [url]

May 27 15 5:36 PM

LeonardoP wrote:
In Brazil, it's also very common: in Alagoas state, there are CRB, CSA and ASA (the three main teams of the state); in Piauí, CRAC; in Mato Grosso do Sul, CENE. The ABC, from Rio Grande do Norte, though, is called ABC Futebol Clube. Other teams, like Marília (MAC) and Joinville (JEC), have their abbreviation as the main nickname.

If JEC will ever make a tour to Holland they should play both PEC (Zwolle) and NEC.

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#16 [url]

May 27 15 7:13 PM

Fast Midfielder wrote:
For Blatter's Imprisonment?

Sadly I think he may have dodged the first bullet, and will be harder to hit with the second one. He will try to spin this as if it was somehow through his work that the arrests were made, and that he is the man to clean up the rest...   Here's hoping the snipers are accurate, and that Blatter is more of a Tony Montana than a Corleone.

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TheRoonBa

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#17 [url]

May 28 15 12:09 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
Not much of an abbreviation in the way of most of these examples, but CPD Llanfairpwll FC in Wales is short for Clwb Pel Droed Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch Football Club, who of course are based in the Anglesey village of Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.
CPD and FC both mean exactly the same (in Welsh and English respectively).

FC Llanfairpwll FC.  Just to make sure we all understand it's a football club.  Similar to the VVV FC example I remember from above, with FC being expressed twice.  Needless.



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TheRoonBa

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#18 [url]

May 28 15 12:12 PM

nfm24 wrote:
Fast Midfielder wrote:
For Blatter's Imprisonment?

Sadly I think he may have dodged the first bullet, and will be harder to hit with the second one. He will try to spin this as if it was somehow through his work that the arrests were made, and that he is the man to clean up the rest...   Here's hoping the snipers are accurate, and that Blatter is more of a Tony Montana than a Corleone.

It's scarcely imaginable that he could oversee such corruption and not be involved.  I think the true extent of his involvement may only come out when he dies (which may happen during the investigation if it's stressful enough).  It seems too many people are afraid of speaking out against him while he is alive.

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#19 [url]

May 28 15 5:11 PM

TheRoonBa wrote:
mattsanger92 wrote:
Not much of an abbreviation in the way of most of these examples, but CPD Llanfairpwll FC in Wales is short for Clwb Pel Droed Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch Football Club, who of course are based in the Anglesey village of Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.
CPD and FC both mean exactly the same (in Welsh and English respectively).

FC Llanfairpwll FC.  Just to make sure we all understand it's a football club.  Similar to the VVV FC example I remember from above, with FC being expressed twice.  Needless.




Worse still would be if someone in Colorado founded a club called CF Rio Grande River FC... smiley: laugh

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#20 [url]

May 28 15 5:47 PM

> It seems too many people are afraid of speaking out against him while he is alive.

Of course, by snipers I meant metaphorical, but I suppose actual snipers are also acceptable in this case.

We've known all along that Blatter was involved (and more than just merely involved, but an active participant in a lot of this). There are books written 10+ years ago which lay all this out on a plate - it just needed a willing powerful force to join the dots. For Blatter personally, the only question is whether his direct involvement needs to actually be proven, or whether there is enough smoke to make him culpable or guilty by association, regardless of proving his actual direct involvement. There always was enough smoke already, but until some arrests are made, it's easy to bat that away by just saying "how come they don't arrest me then?". In any normal situation his position would be untenable (indeed already was many years ago), but football is different. Blatter clings on, the media storm dissipates after a couple of weeks, and so the cycle goes on.

I hope I'm wrong, but all this won't stop him winning the vote. Media are saying Blatter is clever and wily etc etc. He's not all that clever. He just knows that 3/4 is more than 1/4. He knows it is easier to convince perenially bankrupt FAs in the "developing" world to vote for you than it is to convince the rich major "football powers" in UEFA, not least because the needs of the poor countries are simpler to address and achieve. More money, coaching/"development" programmes, more places in tournaments, chance to host tournaments, officials on committees. Blatter spreads these out like confetti because that is what those countries are asking for. Do people really think that all the countries that vote for Blatter are just naive worshippers? Or oblivious? They vote for him because he's highly effective for their needs.

UEFA can bluster about boycotting or whatever, but they have only 1/4 of the members. Votes from the CECAFA region outnumber the major European leagues, and Blatter can and has given them more than any UEFA candidate would. Votes from Pacific Islands even. These places build stadiums named after Blatter, because he has given them rewards for backing him. So far UEFA has offered the rest of the world no alternative to vote for. UEFA puts up a competent sensible morally sound candidate, and then seems confused when that person isn't automatically chosen ahead of Blatter, who tells everybody he can give them what they want.

UEFA's only idea has been "we know what's best, so why not do what we say and let us run things properly". While that is probably true, it isn't politically viable, it doesn't get votes.
It's arrogant, and it's similar to how 50+ years ago Europe looked at the British FAs. More is needed. UEFA must either present a genuine alternative and either negotiate a new successor/rival body to FIFA with the other confederations, or it must withdraw properly (teams, clubs), not just boycott the congress, that only helps Blatter. Do a proper boycott. Refuse to play against countries who voted for Blatter.
If UEFA isn't prepared to boycott properly, or to negotiate a better alternative, then they'll have to put up with being what they are : a dissatisfied minority whose support isn't needed by the ruling party.

And the number of media who are saying Platini is some great alternative, remember (a) Platini voted for Qatar, and (b) Platini had a certain unsavoury link with Blatterism in previous years, so we should look beyond him to find the true "voice of reason"...

I enjoyed some of the press releases from sponsors, mentioning "ethics" etc... no sense of irony in these big companies either. Particularly Adidas (bigger crooks than FIFA, and largely responsible Blatter's rise in the first place). They'll make a noise now but they aren't going to withdraw as that would just allow a major competitor in. And they know their customers (the fans) aren't going to boycott the tournaments or their products even if Blatter is found with millions of dollars stuffed in his suspender belt.

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