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Aug 2 14 4:25 PM

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During a recent browsing session on football in Canada, I noticed that in the past year not only has the 'national league' (story for another thread) CSL been made unrecognised by the CSA (Canadian Soccer Association), but it has continued with a 2014 season regardless, also registering with the new 'Canadian Soccer Federation'. Looking more at the first 2 points (rival federations is again a topic for another thread), have there been other 'rebel' competitions throughout history, especially those that run in direct competition with the 'official' rival? I know that Indonesia had a short-lived effort recent years (Liga Primer Indonesia), lasted around half a season.

As a side point (and another future thread? smiley: wink), the CSL's 'replacement' at Canada's highest/'3rd' level is now a pair of leagues for Ontario and Quebec. Are there any other 'top-tier leagues' split this way (I believe Palestine are an example), particularly with such a 'limited' geographical approach?
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#2 [url]

Aug 2 14 10:46 PM

There are plenty of places where the top tier league has been split geographically, at least up until some final playoff rounds. Most large countries have had this.
For rebel/competing leagues and associations, apartheid South Africa has a complicated history.

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TheRoonBa

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#3 [url]

Aug 4 14 12:13 AM

Yes, there were all the various "Bantustan" leagues for Transkei, Bophuthatswana, etc.

Apparently, South Africa actually seriously considered joining UEFA before joining CAF prior to their readmission to FIFA in the 1990s. They apparently considered this because they thought they would have a better chance of reaching World Cups due to the larger number of vacancies open to UEFA teams (they obviously then considered that UEFA teams are on the whole stronger than CAF teams and decided to do the sensible thing).

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ZHeORaJoZO0C&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Politics+of+South+African+Football&hl=en&sa=X&ei=EtDeU_-PI6aA7QaW4oDQCA&ved=0CCEQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=The%20Politics%20of%20South%20African%20Football&f=false

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#6 [url]

Aug 4 14 4:35 PM

pieter wrote:
and for geographical reasons , I think they would not have been accepted....

Israel and Taiwan were once with the OFC, New Zealand have played AFC events, 3 South American-based nations are in CONCACAF, and Israel are of course currently in UEFA. This would have been the most extreme example if it happened though. Forgetting travel (to probably one of the most generally accessible African nations), would UEFA have considered South Africa?

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#7 [url]

Aug 4 14 7:23 PM

Actually besides Israel countries as Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan and Cyprus are geographically fully situated in Asia. Malta is part of the African plate, thus fully situated in Africa.

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TheRoonBa

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#10 [url]

Aug 5 14 6:04 PM

Interestingly, and on a slightly different note - in the recently concluded Commonwealth Games, the countries were introduced by continent - Africa, Europe, Asia, Oceania, the Caribbean and the Americas. Saint Helena was included in the Americas rather than Africa.

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#11 [url]

Aug 5 14 7:23 PM

Saw that too... can't exactly call 'Caribbean' a continent but I guess their reasoning is that announcing 'South America' on its own would have been a little uneven on the numbers with Falkland Islands and Guyana the only possible names. Still strange how St Helena was not considered African...

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#17 [url]

Aug 6 14 11:17 PM

The Brazilian FA found itself unable to run the 1987 Brazilian Championship, among a lack of funding/sponsorship and legal issues surrounding a proposed decision to reduce the number of teams from the 48 (!) that had taken part the previous year. A group of the 13 most popular clubs in the country ("Clube dos 13") got together and organized a 16-team tournament ("Copa União"), but the Brazilian FA was eventually able to hold its own tournament with another 16 teams. Flamengo and Internacional, the top two from the Clube dos 13 championship, were supposed to meet Sport and Guarani, the top two from the Brazil FA tournament to decide the national champion and the Copa Libertadores spots, but they never showed up.

Officially Sport are the 1987 Brazilian champions, but this has been disputed ever since...

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#18 [url]

Aug 24 14 7:26 PM

mattsanger92 wrote:
pieter wrote:
and for geographical reasons , I think they would not have been accepted....

Israel and Taiwan were once with the OFC
I'm not sure, but if I well remember Israel was never an OFC member. They did take part in some Oceanian play-offs, but without being officially part of OFC. But, I repeat, I'm not too sure.

Talking about rebel leagues, one of the most famous cases was Dimayor, in Colombia, during the so called "El Dorado" era. At a certain moment, that league was even banned from FIFA...

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#20 [url]

Oct 12 14 2:02 PM

Maybe I could've been a little clearer... Taiwan and Israel were still 'involved with' OFC and their qualifying tournaments regardless of membership as Luca mentioned.

On the rebel leagues topic... does it count if the new league is run off-season, but still likely to overtake its competitor in terms of popularity? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Super_League

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