Remove this ad

Lead

Mar 18 15 10:18 AM

Tags : :

I want to share some extraordinary stuff about the most prestigious triumph for the Austrian football: the 1931-1932 Central European International Cup. At that time, the Central European International Cup was the most important competition in continental Europe.

From Sport-Tagblatt



annoshow?call=wst|19321029|1|33.0|0


annoshow?call=wst|19321029|3|33.0|0


From Neuigkeits-Welt-Blatt


annoshow?call=nwb|19320322|1|33.0|0



An interesting report from Il Littoriale from 02/11/1932, explaining that the Italian FA sent a telegram to the Austrian FA congratulating on the great success.

2j64oaw.png



Wunderteam in that period was formidable. They were runners-up at the 1927-1930 Central European International Cup and at the 1933-1935 Central European International Cup; semifinalists at the 1934 World Cup and won the silver medal at the 1936 Olympic Games (although not with their "A" team).
Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Remove this ad

#2 [url]

Dec 21 15 10:44 AM

A spectacular representation about one of the most important successes for the Austrian fußball: their win (3-2) over Italy at Prater Stadium from March 20, 1932. A match played in the frame of the 1931-1932 Central European International Cup. Thanks to this win, Wunderteam would conquer the prestigious tournament.


zsvat1.jpg





Source: magazine La Domenica Sportiva from March 27, 1932

Quote    Reply   

#4 [url]

Dec 22 15 9:55 AM

No, the oldest magazines I own are some issues of Lo Sport Illustrato from the early 1960s. The oldest book I have is Storia Del Calcio In Italia by Antonio Ghirelli, from 1954.

Quote    Reply   

#5 [url]

Jan 9 16 7:34 PM

I've found out some more articles celebrating the Austrian triumph in the 1931-1932 Central European International Cup. Sources define Austria as the "European champions", but they ignored the British teams too easily...


16m3qkw.png


Source: Das Kleine Blatt from October 29, 1932.





24pb75y.png



Source: Voralberger Volksblatt from October 29, 1932

Quote    Reply   

#6 [url]

Jan 10 16 3:14 AM

Luca wrote:
I've found out some more articles celebrating the Austrian triumph in the 1931-1932 Central European International Cup. Sources define Austria as the "European champions", but they ignored the British teams too easily...

Well, they had ruled themselves out by withdrawing from FIFA, so....
Or, we could use the traditional British definition of "Europe" as "the Continent" (only).

Quote    Reply   

#7 [url]

Jan 10 16 9:58 AM

I don't blame the Austrians too much... In 1954, an English newspaper oddly proclaimed Wolverhampton Wanderers "Champions of the World" after winning a couple of friendlies against Spartak Moscow and Honvéd if I well remember...


I have just a minor question: is anybody able to understand the title of the first article I posted? I can read "Oesterreich in Fußball-Europa ......" I don't understand the last word... It's written in gothic and in German, and I don't know either of them...




 



Quote    Reply   

#8 [url]

Jan 10 16 10:34 AM

„Österreich in Fußball-Europa voran.“ voran = ahead
Daily Mail: „Hail Wolves, Champions of the World“
London Times, headline 22/10/1957: “Heavy Fog In Channel. Continent Cut Off.”

It’s seemingly normal, that people think they are the hub of the universe.

Quote    Reply   

#10 [url]

Jan 10 16 8:00 PM

ctr wrote:

London Times, headline 22/10/1957: “Heavy Fog In Channel. Continent Cut Off.”
It’s seemingly normal, that people think they are the hub of the universe.


Despite that the sentiment of that headline would perfectly illustrate the point, there was actually no such headline in reality AFAIK.  It was given in a satirical cartoon around 1940.

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad

#11 [url]

Jan 11 16 6:41 AM

One of my teachers who had lived in the late 1930s in England, told me about 50 years ago of "Fog in Channel ..."

The headline in the Times (1957) was an ironic quotation about a prevalent mindset. The satirical remark around the 1940s referred to a regular weather forecast in the 1930s. But also the weather forecasts used ‘Fog in Channel …” as joke to illustrate perfectly the point.

Quote    Reply   

#13 [url]

Jan 11 16 7:11 PM

Also South Americans, in football, go too far...
The club that wins Copa Libertadores is proclaimed "campeón de América" (champion of America), but technically Copa Libertadores awards just the South American crown.


ctr wrote:
It’s seemingly normal, that people think they are the hub of the universe.
The first time José Mourinho and Cristiano Ronaldo met at Real Madrid...

J.M.: "Nice to meet you, Cristiano. God told me that I am the new messiah".
C.R.: "Oh, really?! I didn't tell you anything at all!"

Quote    Reply   

#15 [url]

Jan 14 16 10:54 AM

When Italy conquered the first edition of the Central European International Cup, "La Stampa" from May 12, 1930 used the same tones: "Gli Azzurri, con una clamorosa vittoria a Budapest, conquistano il titolo di campioni d'Europa" = "Azzurri, thanks to a remarkable win in Budapest, conquer the European champion title".

Quote    Reply   

#18 [url]

Jan 14 16 3:34 PM

Well, considering that in the first editions the British Home Championship was the first, the only and the most important international competition, I wouldn't be surprised if England and Scotland proclaimed themselves "world champions" after winning it....

Last Edited By: Luca Jan 15 16 10:32 AM. Edited 1 time.

Quote    Reply   

#20 [url]

Jan 14 16 9:06 PM

Are you sure? Scotland had a positive record against England at the time.

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help