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TheRoonBa

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Jun 17 15 12:59 PM

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African news sources, and also Indian news sources, are replete with examples of amusing/inappropriate language to describe the outcome of football matches.  There have been 1-0 thrashings, 2-1 destructions and 3-2 wallopings, but I'd never come across one that would contradict itself in the same line until now:


"Shepolopolo have narrowly trounced Zimbabwe 2-1"
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#1 [url]

Jun 17 15 2:32 PM

The booters played a tip-top brand of soccer before lemon time.

One of the most common errors of that sort in overseas English is to write "trashed" instead of "thrashed", but now due to the proliferation of American slang, the two words have merged.

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TheRoonBa

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#2 [url]

Jun 17 15 5:01 PM

The trash/thrash merger was on my mind as well, strangely. There is no use lamenting such usage, as ultimately, the poor spellers/speakers among us are the pioneers who drive language change. I can guarantee that "mischievous" will be pronounced and spelled "mischievious" by everyone in 100 years, even though it's not easier to say, and is actually a whole syllable longer.

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#3 [url]

Jun 17 15 5:19 PM

I particularly like news reports which say that both sides were equally terrible.

Example
Trinidad Guardian, Fri 13 May 1966
Kensington, Thur : 22 inter-territorial footballers shamed the name of the game here today.
Barbados and British Guiana drew 0-0 in a match which was a comedy of errors from start to finish.
The game if anything went from bad to worse as it progressed and the final result was probably the fairest of all.
The standard of play was so low that neither team deserved the honour of a goal. For the record, the ball found the net 3 times but of all 3 occasions (2 for Barbados and 1 for British Guiana), the goals were ruled offside.

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#5 [url]

Jun 21 15 8:40 AM

I don't know why, but nowadays, in the Italian TV commentaries, the term "bloody ball" is quite in fashion. When someone loses the ball creating a danger for his team...

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TheRoonBa

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#7 [url]

Jun 22 15 6:34 AM

Fast Midfielder wrote:
In Holland we have the term "ziekenhuisballen" literally translated "hospital balls" is a players sends a completely wrong pass.

In English, the similar term "hospital pass" exists.  This means a pass to a player who is likely to be tackled heavily by an opposition player.

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#8 [url]

Jun 24 15 2:36 PM

Just to explain further, a "pass" is like a sort of very badly executed aimless hoof which ends up being directed towards a teammate instead of into empty space.

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#10 [url]

Apr 26 16 8:38 PM

nfm24 wrote:
I particularly like news reports which say that both sides were equally terrible.

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