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#21 [url]

TovKirov wrote:
May be she meant the word just in that form - Parliament. In that case she seems to be right.
I see that and raise you Tynwald. So the oldest parliamentary system is British... [checks diagram] kinda.

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#22 [url]

...if a world class footballer comes from Crimea, would he be selected by Russia (RFU)?

Of course, he would. If he would be a Russian citizen and would like to play for RFU-team himself ))
(There were no problems even before 2014, when Crimean football was controlled by Ukrainian FA; Yevgeniy Aldonin is the example)

But I suppose the situation is the same with a selection of Hong Kong-born player by Chinese FA.

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#23 [url]

mattsanger92 wrote:
TovKirov wrote:
May be she meant the word just in that form - Parliament. In that case she seems to be right.
I see that and raise you Tynwald. So the oldest parliamentary system is British... [checks diagram] kinda.

Oldest continuous parliament. But Alþingi is older.

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#24 [url]

TovKirov wrote:
...if a world class footballer comes from Crimea, would he be selected by Russia (RFU)?

Of course, he would. If he would be a Russian citizen and would like to play for RFU-team himself ))

In FIFA eligibility rules it is not sufficient to be a citizen of a country in cases where several associations share the same nationality (this was discussed on the SuppGB thread).  Of course, CFU is not in FIFA, but for the purposes of this thought experiment let us suppose it is. 

Let us suppose that the CFU is a FIFA member and that Crimea is internationally recognized as part of the Russian Federation, and that both the CFU and RFU are two FIFA associations with shared Russian nationality.

Then a player born in Crimea would only be eligible to play for RFU if he had a parent/grandparent born in some non-Crimean part of the Russian Federation. 

Similarly, in the case you mentioned, China would not necessarily be able to select a Hong Kong-born player unless the player had a parent or grandparent born in mainland China.  Since FIFA's player eligibility is based on "territory of the association".

What intrigues me about this wording "territory of the association" is whether it is based on *now* or *at the time of birth* ?


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#25 [url]

Yes, I see it. Of course, I meant eligibility in current situation, when CFU isn't a FIFA member.

I don't know Hong Kong-born players in China national team, but I know some mainland China-born players in Hong Kong national team (Chao Pengfei, Bai He; of course, I don't know about their parents/grandparents, but both of them were born very far from Hong Kong)

Last Edited By: TovKirov . Edited 1 time.

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#26 [url]

In the current situation, a player born in Crimea would (in FIFA's eyes) have been born on the current territory of the Ukraine association. To play for RFU under FIFA rules they would need some parent born on RFU territory. I guess they can play for the CFU without any checks, since it is not a FIFA member.

About the HK players born in PRC, they may have qualified under a residency criterion - also part of the FIFA eligibility rules.

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#28 [url]

BTW the ConIFA player eligibility rules are less strict. Indeed, if I remember correctly, they just allow the member to decide for themselves who can play.

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#29 [url]

pieter wrote:
interesting but is there a chance we will soon see Crimea play against CONIFA members?
There is a chance. Even more, Crimea is a potential host of 2018 ConIFA World Cup:
http://www.conifa.org/en/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/CONIFA-Activity-Report-2016.pdf

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